Tag Archives: keira knightley

Episode 165: The Tokyo Anecdote [Best Films of 2016 So Far; Venice and Toronto Festival Preview]

  lala


Episode 165: The Tokyo Anecdote
[1:10:14]
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It’s Episode 165 of In the Mood for Podcast!

After an eight-month absence, Irini joins Cal to discuss all that cinema has had to offer us in 2016 so far, with both giving their favourite five films and performances of the year, and discussing their personal highlights. With Irini heading to Venice and Cal heading to Toronto, there’s plenty to be excited about concerning festival season. We dig into our biggest hopes from the festivals, and look ahead to year-end releases from Ang Lee and Martin Scorsese, among others. Elsewhere, there’s a Lobster-related story from the heart of Japan, trepidation over Xavier Dolan’s latest cinematic effort fails to faze Irini, and some unexpected virtues of Jaden Smith are revealed.

Best of 2016:

  • Counting down our top five films of the year so far!

[10:30 – 23:15]

2016 Round-Up:

  • Favourite performances, personal highlights, and discussing what films so far may be in the running for year-end awards!

[23:20 – 43:30]

Festival Previews and Anticipation:

  • Discussing our biggest hopes from the Venice and Toronto Film Festival lineups, and anticipating end-of-year releases! 

[43:35 – 1:06:50]

Intro Music: Channing Tatum, “No Dames”
Outro Music: Dev, “Fireball”

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Episode 160: The Back of Black [Everest; The D Train; Solace]

  everest



Episode 160: The Back of Black
[1:17:26]
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It’s Episode 160 of In the Mood for Podcast, a British-based film podcast hosted by Calum Reed of Ultimate Addict and Pete Sheppard of In the Mood for Blog.


This week there’s a ton of news, as we discuss the possibility of Damian Lewis as James Bond, the decision by Sean Penn to sue Lee Daniels, and the final submissions for the Foreign Language Oscar, which include a surprising move from the French committee, and a nationally-questionable entry from Ireland. The week’s reviews see us tackle the frosty climate and eclectic cast of Baltasar Kormakur’s “Everest,” Cal caught Anthony Hopkins’ clairvoyant antics in “Solace,” while an unforeseen plot device in Jack Black comedy “The D Train” saw us glimpse far more of him than we’d like. Elsewhere, Ryan Adams’ cover of Taylor Swift’s album has Pete enthused, and the week’s array of hunks pleases Cal greatly.

The week’s news: 

  • Sixty years without James Dean
  • Damian Lewis rumoured to be the next James Bond
  • Sean Penn sues Lee Daniels for $10m
  • Foreign Language Oscar deadline ends

[4:45 – 20:40]

Opening Segment: This month’s Red Light District, featuring discussion of “Daisy Kenyon,” “It Follows,” “The Secret Life of Walter Mitty,” “Singles,” “So I Married An Axe Murderer,” and “There’s Always Tomorrow”!

[20:45 – 30:10]

Preconception Corner

Reviews of:

  • The D Train               34:35 – 47:20
  • Solace                         47:21 – 54:04
  • Everest                      54:05 – 1:07:30


Shag, Marry or Kill?
The Pootsition
The Garrett Gauge

Outro Music: The Waterboys, “The Whole of the Moon”

Episode 127: Size Matters [Winter Sleep; The Hobbit 3; Get Santa]

17decfilms

Episode 127: Size Matters

[1:33:45]
You can Listen online

It’s Episode 127 of In the Mood for Podcast, a British-based film podcast hosted by Calum Reed of Ultimate Addict and Pete Sheppard of In the Mood for Blog.


It’s the week of the epics, as Peter Jackson finally ends his Middle Earth fascination (we hope, anyway) with the last instalment of The Hobbit, and Nuri Bilge Ceylan has made his longest film yet, with the solemn Palme d’Or winning “Winter Sleep.” We had an awful lot to say about Ceylan’s 196-minute effort, which leads to a discussion of films about actors and an all-out celebration of Ava Gardner, while we managed to get around to festive favourite “Get Santa” and Cal caught the middle-class melodrama “The Face Of Love.” Elsewhere, we discuss the impact of the Golden Globe and Screen Actors Guild nominations, whether Jennifer Aniston can get that Oscar nod, and the early announcements for the Berlin Film Festival brings encouraging news of new films by Terrence Malick, Andrew Haigh, and Kenneth Branagh. We reveal our tentative plans for the festive period, a Turkish delight creates a dilemma for Pete in the Olsen Factor, and a dodgy looking sci-fi effort looks to bring awards favourite Eddie Redmayne crashing back to Earth.

The Week’s News:
  • Berlin Film Festival reveals it will premiere Terrence Malick’s “Knight Of Cups”
  • Screen Actors Guild Award nominations
  • Golden Globe nominations

[4:10 – 23:35]


Preconception Corner

Reviews of:

  • Get Santa
  • The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies
  • The Face Of Love

[29:50 – 1:00:25]

Closing Segment: Our take on Nuri Bilge Ceylan’s Palme d’Or winning  “Winter Sleep,” and discussing films about actors!

[1:00:30 – 1:21:20]

Shag, Marry or Kill?
The Olsen Factor
The Isaac Range

Outro Music: Nancy Sinatra, “These Boots Are Made For Walkin'”

Episode 124: The Gay in Engaging [The Imitation Game; The Drop; Life Itself]

Episode 124: The Gay in Engaging
[1:24:54]
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It’s Episode 124 of In the Mood for Podcast, a British-based film podcast hosted by Calum Reed of Ultimate Addict and Pete Sheppard of In the Mood for Blog.

This week the beer is flowing, and so is the innuendo, as Pete finally has the keys to his brand new house. This forces Cal into a distillation of jukebox classics, before we review the new releases, which include Michael Roskam’s “The Drop” and Roger Ebert documentary “Life Itself,” which prompts Pete to recite some of Roger Ebert’s more baffling reviews. In the wake of Alan Turing biopic “The Imitation Game” we get chatting about our favourite gay characters and icons of cinema, featuring discussion of Oscar Wilde and Billie Holiday, while Cal discloses some of the recent films he’s caught up with from earlier in the year, including a horror film about an urban archaeologist. A hefty news segment sees us discuss Angelina Jolie’s adoption of Derbyshire dialect, plus Eddie Redmayne’s fuckability sees a boost, and Fashion Police finally found a replacement for Joan Rivers. Elsewhere, the cast of Downton Abbey are out in force this week, Cal is feeling guilty for leaving Matthias Schoenaerts in the lurch, we float the possibility of a Tallulah Bankhead biopic starring Cate Blanchett, and Pete recounts a regretful dancefloor moment set to the music of Vanilla Ice.

The Week’s News:
  • Chris Hemsworth voted People Magazine’s “Sexiest Man Alive”
  • Angelina Jolie’s Derby Moment
  • Kathy Griffin announced as Joan Rivers’ replacement on Fashion Police
  • The trailer for Kenneth Branagh’s “Cinderella” is out
Plus! Cal gives a round-up of 2014 films he’s been catching up with, including “As Above, So Below,” “Black Coal, Thin Ice,” and “The Guest”!

[4:15 – 23:10]

Preconception Corner

Reviews of:

  • The Drop
  • Life Itself

[30:25 – 52:15]

Closing Segment: Our take on Oscar-tipped Alan Turing biopic “The Imitation Game,” and discussing LGBT heroes of the film world! 

[52:20 – 1:13:00]

Shag, Marry or Kill?
The Olsen Factor
The Isaac Range

Outro Music: This Mortal Coil, “Holocaust”

Episode 123: The Folly of Ambition [Interstellar; Leviathan; Human Capital]

Episode 123: The Folly of Ambition
[1:38:59]
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It’s Episode 123 of In the Mood for Podcast, a British-based film podcast hosted by Calum Reed of Ultimate Addict and Pete Sheppard of In the Mood for Blog.


This week we’re joined once again by Irini M., who brings us news from her home country’s Thessaloniki Film Festival in a notably more concise fashion than September’s Venice round-up. She also joins in our discussion of some interesting recent events, which includes some rare exciting news involving David O. Russell, and the bizarre spectrum of films vying for this year’s Animated Feature Oscar. We discuss two Foreign Language Oscar contenders, as Paolo Virzi’s “Human Capital” enlivens the middle-class misery of bourgeois Italy and Andrey Zvyagintsev’s “Leviathan” documents the coastal conflicts of rural Russia, before giving ambition a dressing down, as Christopher Nolan’s epic “Interstellar” comes to town. We reveal whether the cinematic influences used in the film are a blessing or curse, and whether Nolan’s scope and logic holds up under scrutiny. Elsewhere, we recount a horror show from Venice which saw Pete become a gay advocate, a mistaken text briefly convinced Cal that his niece was a child genius, while Keira Knightley’s recent quest to boost female self-image has us rather baffled.

The Week’s News:
  • Darren Aronofsky to head the jury at next year’s Berlin Film Festival
  • David O. Russell’s long-delayed “Nailed” re-titled as “Love in Politics” and scheduled for release in the UK
  • Animated Feature Oscar qualifying list is announced
  • European Film Award nominations are announced

[3:05 – 20:55]

Opening Segment: Irini M. provides a round-up of the Thessaloniki Film Festival, which includes discussion of films by Peter Strickland, Susanne Bier, and Mia Hansen-Love!

[21:00 – 34:45]

Preconception Corner

Reviews of:

  • Leviathan
  • Human Capital

[43:25 – 1:01:30]

Closing Segment: Our take on Christopher Nolan’s space-set epic “Interstellar,” and discussing cine-literate films, with comment on “Allegro,” “Kill Bill,” and “Once Upon a Time in the West”!

[1:01:35 – 1:28:40]

Shag, Marry or Kill?
The Olsen Factor
The Isaac Range

Outro Music: Adam and the Ants, “Prince Charming”

Episode 122: The Lake Malfunction [Mr. Turner; Nightcrawler; The Films of 1987]

Episode 122: The Lake Malfunction
[1:28:46]
You can Listen online

It’s Episode 122 of In the Mood for Podcast, a British-based film podcast hosted by Calum Reed of Ultimate Addict and Pete Sheppard of In the Mood for Blog.


This week we’re going retro again, as the Red Light District is back for its monthly outing, bringing news of an amibitious take on spirituality and a French poison-pen mystery, while a BAFTA-winning Maggie Smith performance and a glorious turn by Anne Bancroft turn the discussion to the year of 1987, in which we discuss the qualities of Holly Hunter, Olympia Dukakis, Jack Nicholson, and more! Current releases reviewed include the much-delayed “Charlie Countryman,” Polish surgery procedural “Bogowie,” and Dan Gilroy’s “Nightcrawler,” which had Seydoux repercussions for Jake Gyllenhaal. After that, attention is drawn to the painterly attributes of Mike Leigh’s “Mr. Turner,” but did either of us respond to the grunts and thrusts of Cannes Best Actor winner Timothy Spall? We engage in a brief hum-a-long of the film’s score, before taking the opportunity to discuss our favourite flicks based on the lives of artists, which includes talk of a Ken Russell biopic, a Tarkovsky epic, and a rare moment of non-objectification afforded to Emmanuelle Beart. There’s time to bitch about the running times of recent films in the wake of next week’s near three-hour “Interstellar,” while there are some rare kind words about Shia LaBoeuf, and an Adidas tracksuit unexpectedly provides a retrospective Huston Problem. Elsewhere, one of this week’s performers is unfavourably compared to Danny DeVito, the appeal of Mads Mikkelsen’s blondeness is swiftly dismissed by Cal, and the very thought of Lake Bell causes Pete to malfunction.

The Week’s News:
  • British Independent Film Award nominations are announced

[2:25 – 9:20]

Opening Segment: This month’s Red Light District, featuring discussion of films by Darren Aronofsky, Jack Clayton, Henri-Georges Clouzot, and David Hugh Jones, plus an overview of the films of 1987!

[9:25 – 25:05]

Preconception Corner

Reviews of:

  • Charlie Countryman
  • Nightcrawler
  • Bogowie (Gods)

[29:55 – 53:00]

Closing Segment: Our take on Mike Leigh’s biographical drama “Mr. Turner,” and discussing films based on the lives of artists!

[53:05 – 1:10:45]

Shag, Marry or Kill?
The Olsen Factor
The Isaac Range

Outro Music: Kate Bush, “The Painter’s Link”

Episode 115: The Torvill and Dean Years [A Most Wanted Man; Pride; The Boxtrolls]

Episode 115: The Torvill & Dean Years
[1:52:05]
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It’s Episode 115 of In the Mood for Podcast, a British-based film podcast hosted by Calum Reed of Ultimate Addict and Pete Sheppard of In the Mood for Blog.


This week’s episode tops the 100-minute mark, as we take (a lot of) time out to discuss the many memorable films from 1999, revealing our top tens, and weighing in on some grandiose performances from the year. We also tackle some new releases, with Pete dishing all on the bonkers animation “The Boxtrolls” and Cal revealing how proud the LGBT community should be of “Pride”. We review Norwegian festival circuit favourite “Blind” and Anton Corbijn’s Hamburg-set thriller “A Most Wanted Man,” which features the final leading performance from Philip Seymour Hoffman. Tune in to find out what Pete has spent an excessive amount of money on this week, why Dominic West’s dancing is under scrutiny, and the sheer volume of affection extended to Rachel McAdams. Elsewhere, we discuss the unstoppable Jack O’Connell, Pete’s interruptions during Cal’s review of “Pride” leads to strikes being called, while this week’s Christie Clanger concerns the presence (or lackthereof) of Julie Delpy. 

The Week’s News:
  • “The Imitation Game” wins the People’s Choice award at the Toronto Film Festival
  • George Clooney to receive the Cecil B. DeMille award at the Golden Globes

[3:40 – 10:45]

Reviews of:
  • A Most Wanted Man
  • Pride
  • Blind
  • The Boxtrolls

[22:05 – 1:05:00]

Closing Segment: Our take on the cinema of 1999, featuring discussion of films such as “The Road Home,” “The Talented Mr. Ripley,” and “Rosetta,” and performances by Russell Crowe, Reese Witherspoon, and Cameron Diaz!

[1:05:05 – 1:45:15]

Shag, Marry or Kill?
The Olsen Factor
The Isaac Range

Outro Music: Ravel, “Bolero”

Episode 108: Behind the Vicarage [Dawn of the Planet of the Apes; The Films of 1948]


Episode 108: Behind the Vicarage

[1:34:49]
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It’s Episode 108 of In the Mood for Podcast, a British-based film podcast hosted by Calum Reed of Ultimate Addict and Pete Sheppard of In the Mood for Blog.
 
With a serious dearth of new releases this week, we’ve decided to go back in time to the cinema of 1948, giving our top tens, favourite performances, and disappointments from the year, which drags out the episode to a typically strenuous length. Meanwhile, there’s a trio of deaths in the film world, and a Franco double bill, which includes nuclear romance “Grand Central” and Fanny Ardant in bourgeois drama “Bright Days Ahead.” Pete’s rundown of the latter of those threatened to be as candid as the film itself, but you’ll have to listen to find out whether its boldness had us weak at the knees, or reaching for the sick bowl.  The week’s big movie is “Dawn of the Planet of Apes,” which neither of us were looking forward to, but which does give us time to ponder Mark Wahlberg’s ascent to leading man status, Gary Oldman’s recent career choices, and the absurdity of internal ape politics. Elsewhere, discover how Frieda Pinto gets the raw end of the deal, why Manohla Dargis is the Queen of the fake allegory, and why what happened behind the vicarage in Sutton Park remains a mystery.

The week’s news: 

  • The death of James Garner
  • The death of Elaine Stritch
  • The death of Tom Rolf
  • “The Imitation Game” will open this year’s London Film Festival
  • “Gone Girl” will open this year’s New York Film Festival

[5:15 – 15:20]

Preconception Corner

Reviews of:
  • Dawn of the Planet of the Apes
  • Bright Days Ahead
  • Grand Central

[23:30 – 52:55]

Closing Segment:Discussing our favourite films and performances from 1948, touching upon films by Alfred Hitchcock, Roberto Rossellini, and John Ford, and performances by Olivia De Havilland, Walter Huston, and Laurence Olivier!

[53:00 – 1:24:45]

Shag, Marry or Kill?
The Olsen Factor
The Isaac Range

Outro Music: Madonna, “Lucky Star”

Episode 107: The Four Percent Rule [Boyhood; Begin Again; How To Train Your Dragon 2]



Episode 107: The Four Percent Rule

[1:32:12]
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It’s Episode 107 of In the Mood for Podcast, a British-based film podcast hosted by Calum Reed of Ultimate Addict and Pete Sheppard of In the Mood for Blog.
 
This week we turn our attention to the upcoming Venice Film Festival, discussing the just-announced opening film for 2014, and the recent history of openers at the festival, which include two Steven Spielberg films and a derranged noir effort from Brian DePalma. Change is on the horizon, as the World Cup is over and Pete is now a home owner, but he still couldn’t pluck up the courage to experience Keira Knightley’s vocal tones in John Carney’s “Begin Again,” leaving Cal all alone with some awkward preconceptions about Adam Levine. Meanwhile, we discuss animated Sequel “How to Train Your Dragon 2” and Richard Linklater’s “Boyhood” becomes the longest review on the podcast since… Richard Linklater’s “Before Midnight,” but did our lofty hopes for it get answered? Elsewhere, we talk about our personal experiences of open mic nights, and there’s an epic preconception corner, featuring an infamous slur by John Wayne on Barry Norman, and a major sexual indiscretion by the Maroon 5 front-man concerning everyone’s favourite tennis pro.


Opening Segment: 
Discussing the recent history of opening films at the Venice Film Festival, in the wake of the announcement that Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu’s “Birdman” will open this year’s event!

[4:00 – 24:50]

Preconception Corner

Reviews of:
  • How to Train Your Dragon 2
  • Begin Again

[39:10 – 1:04:20]

 

Closing Segment: Our lengthy take on Richard Linklater’s “Boyhood,” featuring a small discussion of films founded upon gimmicks!

[1:04:25 – 1:24:10]

Shag, Marry or Kill?
The Olsen Factor
The Isaac Range

Outro Music: Glen Hansard & Marketa Irglova, “When Your Mind’s Made Up”

Episode 84: Race to the Finish [Inside Llewyn Davis; August: Osage County; The Missing Picture]



Episode 84: Race to the Finish

[1:00:00]
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It’s Episode 84 of In the Mood for Podcast, a British-based film podcast hosted by Calum Reed of Ultimate Addict and Pete Sheppard of In the Mood for Blog.
 
This week’s episode is our shortest yet, as Pete seized the opportunity to cut the podcast at its knees in the final fleeting minutes. We didn’t quite manage to get it under an hour, but our reviews of starry ensemble drama “August:Osage County” and dour folk-scene tale “Inside Llewyn Davis” are concise enough. We discuss lesser known Oscar-nominated films “The Missing Picture” and “Cutie and the Boxer,” and ponder the Cold War charms of Kenneth Branagh’s “Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit.” Pete pines for the presence of Lena Endre in one of this week’s movies, while we also chat about the politics behind foreign, animated, and documentary crossover movies, and 2013’s highs in cinematography.


The Week’s News:

    • “Grace of Monaco” to open Cannes Film Festival, but which cut?
    • Lindsay Lohan announces her latest project
    • Alfonso Cuaron wins the Directors Guild Award

[2:25 – 8:15]

Preconception Corner

Reviews of:
  • August: Osage County
  • Jack Ryan: Shadow Recruit
  • Cutie and the Boxer
  • The Missing Picture

[14:50 – 43:30]

Closing Segment: Our take on the Coen brothers’ “Inside Llewyn Davis,” and our favourite fictional musicians on film!

[43:35 – 57:20]

Shag, Marry or Kill?
The Watson Factor
The Poupaud Range

Outro Music: Go West, “King of Wishful Thinking”

Episode 74: The Single Life [Gravity; Gloria; The Nun]



Episode 74: The Single Life
[1:29:48]
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It’s Episode 74 of In the Mood for Podcast, a British-based film podcast hosted by Calum Reed of Ultimate Addict and Pete Sheppard of In the Mood for Blog.
 
This episode sees the belated return of the Red Light District, after it had to be excised from last week’s epic 100+-minute recording. Cal is the only one bringing glad tidings, with discussion of a Coen brothers classic, and a semi-positive take on one of Nicholas Cage’s stranger efforts. It’s the week of the singletons, as we caught up with Paulina Garcia’s free-spirited “Gloria,” while Sandra Bullock finds herself alone and stranded in awards juggernaut “Gravity.” It’s safe to say that one of us was rather unimpressed by the space-set adventure, which prompts a brief discussion on films that failed to convince us, including an Ashton Kutcher vehicle and a recent sci-fi hit. Pete’s back from the Leeds Film Festival having seen Serbia’s submission for the Foreign Language Film Oscar, “Circles,” and a concert marred by technical debacles. Listen as we discuss the year’s latest batch of nominations, Isabelle Huppert’s lustful imposition, and Pete’s lament over the lack of viable romantic options among women over thirty. Violins at the ready!

The Week’s News:

  • Lynne Ramsay is being sued by the producers of “Jane Got a Gun”
  • Judi Dench and Harvey Weinstein fight the MPAA
  • European Film Award nominations are announced
  • British Independent Film Award nominations are announced

[3:35 – 20:55]

Opening Segment: This month’s Red Light District, featuring comment on “Blood Simple,” “Knowing,” and “Mouchette”

Preconception Corner*


Reviews of:
  • Gloria
  • Circles
  • The Nun

[36:40 – 1:04:55]

Closing Segment: Our take on Alfonso Cuaron’s “Gravity,” and discussing films we struggle to find convincing!  [1:05:00 – 1:22:10]

Shag, Marry or Kill?
The Watson Factor
The Poupaud Range


Outro Music: Ugo Tozzi, “Gloria”

Episode 60: Sobriety Is a Virtue [The Conjuring; The Heat; Only God Forgives]



Episode 60: Sobriety Is a Virtue
[1:25:02]
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It’s Episode 60 of In the Mood for Podcast, a British-based film podcast hosted by Calum Reed of Ultimate Addict and Pete Sheppard of In the Mood for Blog.

A peroni-less podcast sees Pete on his best behaviour when confronted with a listener question that dares to approach the subject of Keira Knightley (see, we will answer questions about literally anything!) and when forced to tackle “Paris-Manhattan,” a French love letter to Woody Allen. Cal shows less resistance when he reviews “Only God Forgives,” before we unite for reviews of the week’s Hollywood fare, buddy-cop comedy “The Heat,” star-studded action sequel “Red 2,” and spooky box-office smash “The Conjuring.” We’ve also got this week’s Red Light District, which handily ties into Joe Wright’s filmography, and part one of our 2009 Venice retrospective, featuring comment on “I Am Love” and “White Material,” among others. Tune in to find out which country Pete is jetting off to this week, which film’s marketing annoys Cal, and whether Kristin Scott-Thomas’s embodiment of a famous fashion personality bests Helen Mirren’s channeling of Bette Davis. It’s diva overload!

The Week’s News

Listener Question: Is Keira Knightley the Queen of period films? [Zed] [8:15 – 13:00]

Opening Segment: This month’s Red Light District (pimped films include “Letter Never Sent” and “Romancing in Thin Air”) and part one of our 2009 Venice Diaries!   [13:05 – 32:30]


*Preconception Corner*

Reviews of:
  • The Conjuring
  • Red 2
  • Paris-Manhattan
  • Only God Forgives

[37:45 – 1:04:05]

Closing Segment: Our take on Paul Feig’s feminist comedy “The Heat,” and discussing memorable buddy/cop movies!  [1:04:10 – 1:16:50]

Shag, Marry or Kill?
The Watson Factor
The Poupaud Range

Outro Music: Holly Valance, “Down Boy”

Episode 52: Finding Our Voice [Byzantium; The Purge; Populaire]

EPISODE 52: Finding Our Voice
[1:24:35]
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It’s Episode 52 of In the Mood for Podcast, a British-based film podcast hosted by Calum Reed of Ultimate Addict and Pete Sheppard of In the Mood for Blog.

You’ll need to forgive us this week, but we’re a little late to the party. Pete is a very weary traveller having just returned from Nice, but we’re on top form with our discussions of this week’s bevy of releases. We start off with a little news and discussion of our compilation episode, before Cal launches into a colourful review of “Byzantium,” and divulges the somewhat welcome left-wing politics in “The Purge.” “The Big Wedding” left us so bemused and bewildered that our review turns into a barnstorming takedown, and then we dish all on frothy comedy “Populaire,” which we’ve been anticipating for some time. Listen for digressions about “Vertigo,” Oscar’s Best Actor politics, and Pete’s semi-faux pas regarding Gemma Arterton, which barely made the final cut.

Opening Segment:  Discussing our compilation episode and the week’s film news [1:50 – 10:40]

*Preconception Corner*

Reviews of:

  • Byzantium
  • The Big Wedding
  • The Purge
  • Populaire

[17:40 – 1:01:05]

Closing Segment: This month’s Red Light District! We pimp “10 Years,” “Compulsion,” “The Guard,” “House of Pleasures,” and “Rashomon” [1:01:10 – 1:15:20]

*Shag, Marry or Kill?*

*The Watson Factor*
*The Poupaud Range*

Outro Music: New Order, “Ceremony”

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